Fender Mustang and Guitar Combo Highlight B-J Scottsdale Auction

Scottsdale, AZ — The rhythms of an American V8 and an electric guitar were the soundtrack for a generation — and Barrett-Jackson has a fitting music combo cued up for its March 20-27 Scottsdale sale.

Photo: Barrett-Jackson

The company’s Builds team partnered with Fender Guitars to Resto-Mod two of the biggest icons of all time: a 1969 Fender Stratocaster and a 1969 Ford Mustang, and the pair will be offered at no reserve at the March sale. This year marks the half-century milestone anniversary for Barrett-Jackson and the 75th for Fender.

It’s the first time a Barrett-Jackson Builds vehicle will be offered at auction. The Mustang was built by an elite team of craftsmen led by Barrett-Jackson shop foreman Jason Aker of “Fast N’ Loud” fame. Aker and the Builds team — including Tony Cano (also from “Fast N’ Loud”), Barrett-Jackson Vehicle Logistics Manager Jeff Catlin and mechanic Shawn McGee — worked closely with Fender’s Ron Thorn and Mike Lewis to create a special Mustang ready to rock the moment the key is turned.

Watch Episode 1 and Episode 2 of the 10-episode Barrett-Jackson Builds YouTube series.

The build began with a teardown of the Mustang, which was then by painted in a deeply rich shade of gloss black with a contrasting matte hood and trunk. Beneath the custom Boss 429-inspired hood scoop rests a BluePrint engines 347cid V8. The stroked Ford small-block produces a dyno-proven 419hp at 5,600 rpm, and 436 ft/lbs of torque at 4,600 rpm.

The Stratocaster was inspired by Fender’s Principal Master Builder Ron Thorn — whose first car was a 1969 Mustang.

The Stratocaster body shape remains true to form, but the pickguard has been deleted and the electronics located to the rear for a more modern and aggressive look. The guitar uses Fender’s EVH high-output humbuckers, and the custom covers are constructed from actual 1969 Mustang side marker lights.

The traditional 6-screw tremolo unit is replaced with a modern 2-point unit coupled with locking tuners and a graphite nut. The tremolo arm is machined to match the turn-signal arm of the Mustang, and the volume and tone knobs were specially machined to match the radio controls on a ’69 Mustang.

The round-lam ebony fretboard features a more modern 12-inch radius and larger fretwire with “Mustang” inlaid in sterling silver using the same classic font found on the decklid of early Mustangs.